Seminar + Q&A: Professor Ole Paulsen

Synaptic learning rules in the cortex: From spike timing-dependent to network state-dependent synaptic plasticity
Friday 25 May @ 1pm2pm (Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics)

Cortex Club and DPAG are excited to host this seminar by Professor Ole Paulsen from the University of Cambridge on Friday May 25th at 4.30pm in the Large Lecture Theatre, Le Gros Clark Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics. After the talk there will be a Q&A session with the speaker from 2-3pm in the Sherrington Library with a free sandwich lunch! If you would like to attend this Q&A session, please RSVP to cortex.club -at- studentclubs.ox.ac.uk

Seminar: Professor Igor Timofeev

What we know and what we don’t know about sleep slow oscillation
Tuesday 22 May @ 4.30pm5.30pm (Large Lecture Theatre, Le Gros Clark Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics)

Cortex Club and SCNI present this seminar by Professor Igor Timofeev from the Centre de Recherche Cervo, Université Laval on Tuesday May 22nd at 4.30pm in the Large Lecture Theatre, Le Gros Clark Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics. After the talk we will go to University Club (11 Mansfield Rd) for some food and drinks with the speaker. All university members welcome!

Abstract
Slow oscillation is a major component of brain electrographic activity during sleep. Descriptively, it is composed of two neuronal states: active and silent. Slow oscillation originates in cortex. Active states start typically in frontal cortex and propagate backward. Silent state onset occurs relatively synchronized across cortical mantle. There are many unresolved questions of origin of slow oscillation: how activity starts when the whole cortex is silent? Which neuronal properties for frontal cortex make it preferential site of origin of propagating active states? Why active states of slow oscillation during slow-waves terminate and terminate nearly simultaneously across large cortical territories, and why they do not terminate during REM sleep or waking state?

Seminar: Professor David Dupret

Parsing hippocampal ensembles and acting upon their retrieval
Thursday 17 May @ 4.30pm6pm (Le Gros Clark Lecture Theatre, Le Gros Clark Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics)

We’re proud to host Professor David Dupret from the University of Oxford on Thursday May 17th at 4.30pm in the Le Gros Clark Lecture Theatre, Le Gros Clark Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics. After the talk we will go to the Eagle & Child for some food and drinks. Feel free to join!

Abstract
Hippocampal neuronal activity, described in terms of spatio-temporally organised spike discharge and rhythmic fluctuations of the local field potentials, supports information processing with relevance to memory. However, the circuit-level mechanisms that momentarily define the acquisition, the consolidation or the retrieval of mnemonic information remain somewhat elusive. In this talk, I will present novel findings describing how spectral components nested in individual cycles of the theta-band (4–12Hz) oscillations report transient hippocampal operating modes with complementary mnemonic roles. I will then share some recent work that uncover a circuit motif embedded in the nucleus accumbens that enables the behavioural readout of a hippocampal memory representation. Altogether, these data further highlight how fine-grained neuronal dynamics in the hippocampus and connected circuits promote behaviourally-effective memory.

Seminar + Q&A: Professor Laura Busse

Mouse dLGN receives input from a diverse population of retinal ganglion cells with limited convergence
Friday 11 May @ 1pm2pm (Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics)

Together with DPAG we’re happy to be hosting Professor Laura Busse from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München on Friday May 11th at 1pm in the Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics. The seminar will be followed by a student Q&A with Professor Busse including free lunch! Please sign up for this by e-mailing to cortex.club [at] studentclubs.ox.ac.uk. We look forward to seeing you there!

Seminar + Q&A: Professor Israel Nelken

Frequency-specific adaptation and stimulus- specific adaptation in the auditory system
Friday 4 May @ 1pm2pm (Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics)

In partnership with the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics we’re hosting Professor Israel Nelken from The Edmond and Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences and the Silberman Institute of Life Sciences. He will give a seminar on Friday May 4th at 1pm in the Large Lecture Theatre in the Sherrington Building, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics.

There will also be a student Q&A the day before on Thursday May 3rd, at 2pm in the OCGF Seminar Room, Oxford Centre for Gene Function, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics (accessible via Sherrington Reception). Prof. Nelken has kindly agreed to give a short overview of his work at the beginning of the students session to facilitate the subsequent discussion over coffee and biscuits. All are welcome!