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Seminar: Professor Daniel Salzman

October 12, 2015 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Neural mechanisms for the genesis, expression, and control of emotional behaviour
Monday 12 October @ 4:00 pm5:30 pm (Le Gros Clark Lecture Theatre)

Professor Daniel Salzman MD PhDDaniel_Salzman of the Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience and Kavli Institute for Brain Science at the Columbia University School of Medicine will be speaking at our first event for the academic year on the neural mechanisms that give particular sensory stimuli emotional value. His research group has developed a genetic strategy identifying the representations of rewarding and aversive unconditioned stimuli (US) in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of mice and has recently published results suggesting that neural representations of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli are ultimately connected to US-responsive cells in the BLA to give rise to both innate and learned responses.

Abstract
Stimuli that possess inherently rewarding or aversive qualities elicit emotional responses and also induce learning by imparting valence upon neutral sensory cues. Evidence has accumulated implicating the amygdala as a critical structure in mediating these processes. In this talk, I will review recent work in which we developed a genetic strategy to identify the representations of rewarding and aversive unconditioned stimuli (USs) in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and then examined their role in innate and learned responses. We demonstrate that neural representations of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli ultimately connect to US-responsive cells in the BLA to elicit both innate and learned responses. However, the capacity to control emotions through cognitive operations indicates that neural representations of the emotional significance of stimuli must be able to be regulated in a flexible manner. Neurons in prefrontal cortex (PFC) are known to encode rules, goals and other abstract information, and thereby could play a critical role in the flexible regulation of emotion. I will review evidence that the amygdala also encodes abstract information that could underlie this flexibility. Further, I will present data that provides new insights into the genesis of cognitive processing in the amygdala.

Further reading
Gore et al. (2015). Neural representations of unconditioned stimuli in basolateral amygdala mediate innate and learned responses. Cell. 162:1, 134–145.

Details

Date:
October 12, 2015
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Venue

Lecture Theatre, Le Gros Clark Building
Le Gros Clark Building
Oxford, OX1 3QX
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